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Always The Humble and Resilient Nipa

Cbanga360.Net - The Bicol Street Journal

Published     28 Feb , 2010  2:16 pm   Updated   2 Apr , 2016 at 4:12 pm   5,767 views.

The nipa (pronounced neepa, as in long e) palm or nypa fruticans is an unusual tree that thrives abundantly on the creek at the back of our house. Obviously it is the perfect and natural breeding area which is muddy and wet ground. This particular nipa shoots its fronds or leaves up to about three to four meters in height out of its usually submerged trunk. A resilient specie, the nipa is from the genus Nypa and the sole palm that thrives as mangrove. It is also very tolerant of the yearly dry season in our place.

It bears cluster of globular flowers that develop into miniature coconut-like dark brown “fruits” which contain nuts. Young fruits yield inside a firm gelatinous meat, called kaong, we use to mix with fruit(y) salads.

Farmers also tap the young flower clusters and extract the sap for fermentation and aging. The fermented sap is turned either into an alcoholic beverage locally known as tuba with a mild sweet taste but a potent and inebriating drink. Known to yield sap with a very high sugar content, nipa is a proven source of ethanol three times more than the yield from sugarcane.

In our locality the nipa is a popular and natural source of roofing and wall materials taken from the upright palm tree leaves woven into the finished shingles.

Thank you for hosting Luiz, Denise, Laerte and Valkyrien. See more flowers here at: Today’s Flowers

This is my post for This is My World. Many thanks to Klaus, Sandy, Wren, Fishing Guy, Louise and Sylvia for hosting this wonderful meme: My World – Tuesday.

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16 Responses

  1. Japa says:

    Should be a good day for appreciating flowers around the world.

  2. JJ says:

    That was very interesting – thanks. Nothing like it here in the UK
    JJ

  3. guild-rez says:

    How interesting..Nypa fruticans
    I believe it is a palm tree?
    Great shot!

  4. SandyCarlson says:

    That is one potent and giving plant. Beautiful.

  5. Regina says:

    Amazing plant!
    Great captures.
    Have a nice week Japa.

  6. AL says:

    Are those the ones used to build hut? If that is so…I never saw a nipa tree. Thanks for sharing.

  7. This Is My Blog - fishing guy says:

    Japa: What an interesting tree, thanks so much for sharing this information.

  8. Titania says:

    I am all for this plant, beautiful, tough, reliable with great potential.
    It is always interesting to know about different plants. I grow a small native palm with yellow flowers at the trunk base. It is a vigorous and tough plant too, beautiful with broad pleated leaves, common name is weevil palm. I do not know its scientific name I have to investigate.

  9. noel says:

    aloha,

    this are very scenic photos of this plant, you captured some beautiful shots of this..thanks for sharing

    noel

  10. Indrani says:

    Great info on the plant. Lots of use for the locals there. Great post.

  11. Photo Cache says:

    I am so ashamed that I didn’t know this, I feel so unpinoy.

    Thanks for sharing. I appreciate the education.

    http://www.ewok1993.wordpress.com

  12. zeal4adventure says:

    Great info here. I also didn’t know that kaong came from nipa.

  13. Carver says:

    Thanks for the informative post about the nipa.

  14. Denise says:

    A wonderful plant and great photos, thank you so much for sharing them with Today’s Flowers.

  15. […] was about to post a follow-up on my first post nipa palm today but had to make a revision instead. Anyway, the nipa shingles like the batch above are used […]

  16. Zam says:

    Producing Nypa sap to ethanol or nypa by products is solely intellectual property gazette to Pioneer Bio Industries Corporation (PBIC) as we search in World Intellectual Property Organization(WIPO). Anyone who interested to do business should contact PBIC to get proper position. Truly it is good business. To know about the company you can search at http://www.mypbic.org.